• Document: Lesson Outline for Teaching
  • Size: 238.29 KB
  • Uploaded: 2019-03-13 18:41:42
  • Status: Successfully converted


Some snippets from your converted document:

Lesson Outline for Teaching Lesson 1: Using the Periodic Table A. What is the periodic table? 1. The periodic table is a chart of the elements arranged into rows and columns according to their chemical and physical properties. 2. The table can be used to determine how all elements are related to one another. B. Developing a Periodic Table 1. In the mid-1800s, Russian chemist and teacher Dimitri Mendeleev created a table to help classify the elements by their properties. a. He placed the elements in rows of increasing atomic mass. b. The elements in the table showed repeating patterns; periodic is a word used to describe such patterns. c. For example, Mendeleev noticed patterns in the melting point of elements, the temperature at which a solid changes to a liquid. 2. After arranging the known elements in a periodic table, Mendeleev noticed large gaps between some elements. He predicted that scientists would find new elements to fit into these spaces. Mendeleev’s predictions were correct. 3. In the early 1900s, Henry Moseley found that the problem with Mendeleev’s table could be solved if the elements were arranged in rows by atomic number. 4. The atomic number is the number of protons in the nucleus of an atom of an element. Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. C. Today’s Periodic Table 1. You can identify the properties of an element by studying its placement on the periodic table. 2. The element key shows the element’s name, atomic number, chemical symbol, state of matter, and atomic mass. 3. A(n) group is a column on the periodic table. 4. Elements in the same group have similar chemical properties, which means they react with other elements in similar ways. 5. The rows in the periodic table are called periods. 6. As you read from left to right across the periodic table, atomic number increases by one for each element. 7. Most of the elements in the periodic table are metals, which are shiny and conduct thermal energy and electricity. T2 The Periodic Table Lesson Outline continued 8. Most nonmetals are on the right side of the periodic table; these elements do not conduct thermal energy and electricity. 9. Between the metals and nonmetals on the periodic table are the metalloids, which have properties of metals and nonmetals. D. How Scientists Use the Periodic Table 1. Scientists use the periodic table to predict the properties of the new elements they create. 2. Elements that are near each other on the periodic table share similar properties. Discussion Question How are elements in the same group of the periodic table likely to be similar and different? How are elements in the same period of the periodic table likely to be similar and different? Elements in the same group are likely to have similar chemical properties; they might also have similar physical properties or be different by showing distinct patterns in their physical properties. Elements in the same period increase as you move from left to right; their properties change in patterned ways as you move across the period. Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. The Periodic Table T3 Lesson Outline for Teaching Lesson

Recently converted files (publicly available):