• Document: Axial Flow Compressor Mean Line Design
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 Axial Flow Compressor Mean Line Design Niclas Falck February 2008 Master Thesis Division of Thermal Power Engineering Department of Energy Sciences Lund University, Sweden   © Niclas Falck 2008 ISSN 0282-1990 ISRN LUTMDN/TMHP—08/5140—SE Printed in Sweden Lund 2008    Preface This master thesis has been conducted at the division of Thermal Power Engineering, department of Energy Science, Lund University, Sweden. This experience has been very educational in terms of modeling and computing thermal energy devices. This thesis has been about axial flow compressors, but the approach and methodic that I have implemented in this thesis will also be useful in my future career as an Engineer regardless of branch. I want to thank my supervisor Magnus Genrup for his support and expertise in the field of turbomachinery. I also want to thank the rest of the department of Energy Science, especially my fellow master thesis workers, for an enjoyable time here in Lund.   Abstract The main objective in this thesis is creating a method on how one can model an axial flow compressor. The calculation used in this thesis is based on common thermodynamics and aerodynamics principles in a mean stream line analyses. Calculations based on one stream line i.e. one dimension, is a good first start to model a compressor. Most of the correlations and thermodynamics are based on one stream line, or they can be modified to work on one stream line. By just a handful of design specifications an accurate model can be generated. These specifications can be mass flow, rotational speed, number of stages, pressure ratio etc. The pressure ratio is also the one parameter that the calculation aims to satisfy. If the calculation results in a pressure ratio that is not what was specified in the beginning an adjustment must be made on one parameter. In this case the stage load coefficient is selected. By changing the stage loading coefficient and keeping the other parameters constant the pressure ratio will vary. This is done in an iterative process until the pressure ratio is converged. The purposes of modeling compressors based on correlations and thermodynamics and not model them in a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulation program at once is that it takes a long time for a calculation to converge in a CFD program. Finding better correlations and methods on how one can model a compressor will result in fewer hours fine tuning them in advanced fluid dynamic programs and hence same time and not to mention money.   Content Nomenclature .................................................................................................................. 4 Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 6 1 Background .................................................................................................................. 7 1.1 Gas turbine .............................................................................................................. 7 1.2 Compressor ............................................................................................................. 8 1.3 Stagnation property ................................................................................................. 9 2 Compressor Fundamentals ....................................................................................... 11 2.1 Compressor operation ........................................................................................... 11 2.2 Blade to Blade Flow path ...................................................................................... 12 2.3 Rothalpy ................................................................................................................ 13 2.4 Compressor Losses................................................................................................ 14 2.4.1 Profile-loss ..................................................................................................... 15 2.4.2 Endwall-loss ................................................................................................... 15 2.5 Blade geometry ..................................................................................................... 16 2.6 Dimensionless Parameters .................................................................................... 16 2.6.1 Stage load coefficient ..................................................................................... 17 2.6.2 Stage flow coefficient ...................................................................................... 17 2.6.3 Stage reaction ................................................................................................. 17 2.6.4 de

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