• Document: Victim Offender Mediation Training Manual
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Dialogue-Driven Victim Offender Mediation Training Manual A Composite Collection of Training Resource Materials by Mark S. Umbreit, Ph.D. Ted Lewis, MA May 2015 Center for Restorative Justice & Peacemaking School of Social Work University of Minnesota Copyright 2015 Center for Restorative Justice & Peacemaking, University of Minnesota pg. 1 Copyright 2015 Dr. Mark S. Umbreit and Ted Lewis, Center for Restorative Justice & Peacemaking Reproduction of this document in part or whole must contain the following: “Reproduced with permission by the Center for Restorative Justice & Peacemaking, School of Social Work, University of Minnesota.” Parts of this manual were initially produced as a product of a grant from the Office for Victims of Crime, U.S. Department of Justice to the Center for Restorative Justice & Mediation, and copyrighted in 1998 as The Victim Sensitive Victim Offender Mediation Training Manual. Within that edition were some parts written or prepared by William Bradshaw, Ph.D., Marlene Young, and Jean Greenwood, M.Div., and these were also in the updated version of January 2006. Note: This 2015 manual edition is designed to be a large composite of materials that cover restorative justice and victim offender dialogue work. It is not designed to be a fully reproducible edition for a single training purpose. Secondly, while restorative conferencing and victim offender mediation in the realm of criminal justice are the primary models covered in this manual, much of the content has wider applications for other work involving restorative dialogue. Copyright 2015 Center for Restorative Justice & Peacemaking, University of Minnesota pg. 2 Table of Contents Section 1 Foundations of Restorative Dialogue a. How to be a Good Trainer for Victim Offender Dialogue (T. Lewis) p. 5 b. Restorative Justice Through Victim Offender Mediation (M. Umbreit) p. 7 c. Principles and Models for Restorative Justice (M. Umbreit) p. 14 d. Overview of Restorative Justice (T. Lewis) p. 18 e. Overview of the Restorative Movement and Models (T. Lewis) p. 23 f. The Restorative Paradigm (M. Umbreit) p. 25 g. Best Practices We’ve Learned from Research (M. Umbreit) p. 27 h. Restorative Justice Basics (M. Umbreit) p. 30 i. Victim Offender Mediation and Dialogue (Mark Umbreit) p. 37 Section 2 Understanding Victims and Offenders a. Understanding the Victim Experience and Needs (T. Lewis) p. 44 b. Understanding Crime Victims (Marlene Young) p. 47 c. Crisis Intervention and Supports for Victims (M. Young) p. 54 d. Summary of Needs of Crime Victims (adapted by Umbreit) p. 72 e. Understanding the Offender Experience and Needs (T. Lewis) p. 78 f. Working with Offenders (adapted from William Bradshaw) p. 81 Section 3 The Victim Offender Mediation Process a. Overview of Victim Offender Mediation (M. Umbreit) p. 91 b. A Humanistic Approach to Victim Offender Mediation (M. Umbreit) p. 95 c. Working With Offenders: Case Development p. 97 d. Risks and Benefits of VOM Mediation p. 100 e. Summary of the Entire VOM Process p. 102 f. Detailed Overview of VOM Process (T. Lewis) p. 112 g. Additional Resources for VOM Mediators (T. Lewis) p. 123 h. The Mediation Process: Phases and Tasks (Jean Greenwood) p. 138 i. Tips for VOM Mediators (Jean Greenwood) p. 158 j. Guidelines For Victim Sensitive Mediation & Dialogue With Offenders (Mark Umbreit and Jean Greenwood) p. 166 k. The Structure and Content of Victim Offender Dialogue (T. Lewis) p. 182 l. A Humanistic Approach to Mediation (Umbreit and Lewis) p. 192 Copyright 2015 Center for Restorative Justice & Peacemaking, University of Minnesota pg. 3 Section 4 Managing a Victim Offender Mediation Program a. Program Development Issues to be Faced in Starting a Program (Umbreit and Greenwood) p. 204 b. Additional Resources for Managing Programs and Hard Cases (Ted Lewis / VORS-CYS) p. 223 c. How To Handle Special VOM Cases (Ted Lewis / VORS-CYS) p. 241 Copyright 2015 Center for Restorative Justice & Peacemaking, University of Minnesota pg. 4 What Makes for a Good Trainer by Ted Lewis A good trainer…  Gives not only information but inspiration. Not only does the trainer model this head/heart balance, but also helps trainees to learn through both the head and the heart.  Draws from a variety of learning styles. Rather than relying on just one or two mediums for instructing, the trainer can move freely between multiple mediums and styles, knowing that participants learn things in a variety of ways.  Moves easily between theory and real life examples. In the same way a picture is worth a thousand words, illustrations from real life communicate quickly and effectively, and also ground the

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